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Grenfell science students recognized by national research agency

Recently, eight Grenfell students received undergraduate student summer research awards from The Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), federal funding agency for university-based research in natural sciences and engineering.

 

With this funding, students will work with NSERC-funded Grenfell professors on areas for 16 weeks during the summer months.

 

"The quality of our research and the impressive efforts of our students is evident in our success in receiving this high number of student research grants," said Dr. Michele Piercey-Normore, dean of the School of Science and the Environment. "These opportunities not only help add to the body of knowledge in their respective areas of research, but provide the students exceptional learning opportunities and experiences in their research. As a result, they will be stronger students that will bolster our academic programs."

 

Here's a little about the successful students:

Emily Alexander, psychology

Working with Grenfell's Cognitive Aging and Auditory Neuroscience (CAAN), Ms. Alexander is conducting a study investigating differences in how formally trained and self-taught musicians process sound.

 

Dylan Ruth, computational mathematics and physics

Mr. Ruth's research is based around experimental particle physics. He is building a cosmic ray spark chamber to trace the paths of muons, and then retrace it to find the muon's vertex of decay in the upper atmosphere.

Nicholas O'Neill, computational mathematics and physics

Mr. O'Neill's research is based on the MOLLER experiment in subatomic physics, creating specific look up tables with columns for beam energy, scattering angle, cross-section and asymmetry all based on the data provided  by the Jefferson Lab team in USA.

Mallory Snow, physics

Winner of the Canadian Institute of Nuclear Physics award

Ms. Snow is researching a new generation of high-precision electroweak experiments such as parity violating electron-electron scattering is called the MOLLER experiment as is planned at the Jefferson Lab with a goal to evaluate these happenings with more precision and reliability.

Abby Anderson, computational mathematics

Using differential equations, Ms. Anderson is studying population dynamics using models to predict what will happen to a population when different factors are considered like predation, competition with other species and changes on habitat boundaries.

Brittany Pittman, computational mathematics

Ms. Pittman is doing research in combinatorial design theory; a discipline of mathematics, under the branch of combinatorics, that studies the arrangement of elements of finite sets into structures subject to specified conditions. Examples of these structures include block designs or latin squares of which we can see a sudoku grid as a special case. 

Nicole Walsh, undeclared

Ms. Walsh's research project is titled The effect of shelf life on the quality and safety of cooking sauces with the goal to answer two questions:  1. Does the nutritional value of sauces degrade with time after opening 2. Could the shelf life of sauces have a positive/negative impact on your health.

Megan Clarke, environmental science (biology)

The goal of Ms. Clarke's research is to investigate scavenging behavior following bird mortalities resulting from collisions with windows using motion activated cameras set up to monitor dead bird carcasses placed next to buildings and in other habitats around Grenfell Campus.

 

Caption: Students Mallory Snow, Dylan Ruth, Brittany Pittman, Abby Anderson and Emily Alexander are amongst the Grenfell students working on NSERC grants this summer.

 

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